The software that helps track a stolen mobile phone – and is IMPOSSIBLE to delete

Posted on: November 19th, 2013

With modern smartphones being as expensive as they are, safety is always a vital concern.

The software that helps track a stolen mobile phone – and is IMPOSSIBLE to delete

 

A company has launched revolutionary software for tracking stolen mobile phones that is impossible to remove from the device – even with a factory reset.

Absolute LoJack allows users to remotely lock their stolen device, locate it, and delete sensitive files to prevent identity theft.

The company’s Investigations and Recovery Services team can track phones using the Computrace system, pictured, and will work with law enforcement agencies globally to get a device back.

And unlike apps already on the market such as Find my iPhone and Hidden, Lojack will survive a factory reset and full erase.

It is built into the firmware on Android phones such as the Samsung Galaxy S4 and the Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 tablet.

 

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/

 

Children’s ‘exposure to mobile phones should be limited’

 

Children and heavy users of mobile phones should limit their exposure to the devices, France’s safety watchdog advised, despite concluding that there was “no proven effect” on health.

The National Agency for Health, Food and Environmental Safety (Anses) said it would make a recommendation to limit exposure to the devices, with heavy use defined as 40 minutes of conversation a day.

The report was issued by a panel of 16 experts, who looked at more than 300 scientific studies that have been published since 2009, when the recommendations were last assessed.

The panel noted some studies that have suggested a higher long-term risk of brain cancer for heavy users of mobile phones, Anses said.

In a landmark ruling last October, an Italian court ruled that a commerce manager was entitled to compensation from his company because a brain tumour he developed was due to spending up to six hours per day on his mobile phone for 12 years as part of his job.

 

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/